Books Can Be Deceiving

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I was surprised by some of the twists along the way. I also laughed several times along the way, and part of the climax made me want to cheer. Read my full review at Carstairs Considers. What am I going to do? Another book that I started and just could not put down. Until way past when I should have been asleep. LOL Seriously who wouldn't love reading about a Librarian, who loves to read, who is solving a mystery that may land her best friend and Children's librarian in jail for murder.

Don't answer that LOL. A good read that I wholeheartedly recommend. Feb 20, Peggy R rated it really liked it Shelves: book-related-themed , purchased , craving-for-cozies-challenge , cozy-mystery-books , goodreads-reading-challenge. This series has been on my TBR pile for longer than it should. I really enjoyed this first book. Lindsey is smart and mature with a level head on her shoulders.

Her friend Beth makes a great complement and they have a good friendship. The rest of the ladies in the crafting book club round out the cast nice This series has been on my TBR pile for longer than it should. The rest of the ladies in the crafting book club round out the cast nicely and I look forward to getting to know their characters better. The mystery was solid and woven nicely through the plot of the story. The only criticism I have is that the town sheriff was a stereotype of the blundering small town sheriff that I hope gets better as the series goes along.

I really enjoy this author's writing style. She creates a wonderful charming world and fills it with characters that will grab readers attention allowing them to relate to someone in each story. I am looking forward to reading more in the series I have the next four books on my TBR pile. Nov 27, Sara rated it really liked it Shelves: i-love-libraries , cozy , mystery. I really, really enjoyed this first book to be added to my new shelf and reading project code name "Operation I Love Libraries" which will be its code name only for as long as it takes me to come with a better, cleverer title please message me any suggestions.

I thought it might be fun to start a list of books that either take place in libraries or feature librarians as the major character and what better place to start then with a mystery solving librarian! Our heroine is the new director of t I really, really enjoyed this first book to be added to my new shelf and reading project code name "Operation I Love Libraries" which will be its code name only for as long as it takes me to come with a better, cleverer title please message me any suggestions.

Lindsey left her life as an archivist at the prestigious Yale University library and her cheating fiancee six months ago desperate for a fresh start. With the encouragement of her best friend Beth, who also happened to be the children's librarian at Briar Creek, she applied for the director's post and won the confidence of its board with her innovative ideas and fresh enthusiasm.

Lindsey is slowly settling in to Briar Creek, a beautiful coastal town in Connecticut with its quirky residents and small town charm. She's made some changes to the traditional little library that don't sit well with all the residents but most have embraced her "Crafternoon" book club and admire her determination to update things. And while she's determined to distance herself from romance she can't help but notice and share the sidelong glances she's been getting from Sully a local boat captain.

But just when things are coming together tragedy strikes. Beth's newly dumped former boyfriend, a Caldecott winning children's book illustrator, is found horribly murdered in his solitary island home. To complicate matters further he's turned up dead just one day after Beth dumped him in a dramatic and very public scene. The local chief of police who, as far as Lindsey is concerned, couldn't detect his way out of a paper bag is ready to arrest Beth as the typical woman scorned. With nothing much to go on except the knowledge that her best friend could no more kill a housefly than a person Lindsey decides if the police aren't going to look for the real murderer she will.

This really was a lot of fun and I'm absolutely looking forward to diving into this series. Lindsey is a terrific character. There's a tendency in cozies I find for the detective to be very soft and reluctant to get into confrontations which makes sense since the basic idea of a cozy is to soften the usual violence and gore that populate grittier novels. What's nice here is author Jenn McKinlay is basically like "screw that" and writes Lindsey as an assertive woman who doesn't just sit there while another character yells in her face. She gets into more than one verbal sparring match with people who piss her off and its refreshing.

The irony of course is that as the library director she probably ought to be more politic but god is it satisfying to watch her lay into a particularly horrendous helicopter mom who's demanding she fire Beth "the murderess. She's got a temper and sometimes its helpful when she stands up to the giant tool of a police chief and sometimes its a hindrance when she stands up to the crazy murderer with a gun.

The dialogue is also really excellent, smart and modern and not laden with a lot of local yokel, aren't they so quaint with their Quaker talk nonsense that also tends to be something of a hallmark of this type of mystery. Briar Creek also seems like a place I'd actually want to live. Sure its a nice seaside village away from the big city with pretty views and occasionally violent stormy nights but its not so quaint that you want to throw up.

McKinlay manages to weave just enough quirky landlady's, retired actresses, and salty diner owners into a perfectly normal town in anywhere USA so that you have fun with the goofier touches and still feel like this is someplace real. The way she approaches solving the mystery and the mystery itself also follow a really logical path, which absolutely does not always happen in a book like this.

Part of what's great about making your detective a librarian is it just makes sense. I'm tooting my own horn a bit here but darn it librarians are smart! And we're good at research and most of us are veritable repositories of random, esoteric knowledge that we just know because we had to look it up for some lunatic. We also don't back away from the challenge of ferreting out an answer even if it takes forever. McKinlay also very smartly gives Lindsey a personal stake in this first foray into detection, you absolutely get why she wants the answers.

You also spend enough time with everyone to see that Beth is a great person, a great friend and absolutely not a murderer so you're just as anxious as Lindsey to figure out what really happened.

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Really my only beef is the somewhat sudden resolution to the story that was just a tad too melodramatic for me. Don't get me wrong it fits the mystery and its even pretty clever there's just something very Hollywood about the climax that didn't fit the tone of the rest of the book. That being said I'm still very keen to revisit Briar Creek and see how Lindsey shakes out as a sleuth. My guess is McKinlay gets stronger in her murder plotting as this series, which I think is now up to eight books, goes on and I'm looking forward to find out! View 1 comment. Sep 02, Marci rated it it was ok. I enjoyed the story a lot after getting over the first chapter and despite a lot of awkward writing and a major dangling plot point that was never accounted for.

Or else I would give it more stars. I do plan to read more of her books because the characters are great. I almost stopped reading in the first chapter because of the awkward dialog. Characters said the most obvious, stilted things by way of exposition. Why not edit the dialog and put the exposition beside it? Here's an example-- "Where' I enjoyed the story a lot after getting over the first chapter and despite a lot of awkward writing and a major dangling plot point that was never accounted for.

Here's an example-- "Where's Mary? I hope she brings some chowder with her," Violet said. Nobody mentions the state of the weather to other people who are also experiencing it. People just say, "Don't you love this weather? Beth should have said, "That would be perfect in this weather. Can you tell I'm in a very picky mood? I'm going to get more nitpicky. The mixed and otherwise odd metaphors began to drive me crazy. Here's the one that I wish I could forget--". Ummmm, nothing at all. Also, the coastal setting is fabulous as well. The narration was excellent.

Oct 24, Cheryl Landmark rated it liked it. This was a fun, cozy mystery with mostly interesting characters and a fairly decent murder plot. But, alas, all was not rainbows and roses. The setting of the small town and library was typical of these types of mysteries, as were a lot of the characters, some of whom were a little too stereotypical. Why, oh, why, I ask myself, does nearly every local police chief in these books have to be a bumbling, stupid, narrow-minded, incompetent bozo who immediately pegs one person as a suspect in the mur This was a fun, cozy mystery with mostly interesting characters and a fairly decent murder plot.

Why, oh, why, I ask myself, does nearly every local police chief in these books have to be a bumbling, stupid, narrow-minded, incompetent bozo who immediately pegs one person as a suspect in the murder and absolutely refuses to investigate any other leads? Ugh, this is getting to be a little too formulaic and annoying. And, the murder victim had absolutely no redeeming qualities and was so obnoxious, selfish and unlikeable that it was a wonder someone had not offed him sooner!

Why Beth had put up with him for five years was way beyond me. Was she that desperate for a man and marriage that she could turn a blind eye to all his faults and flaws? Lindsey was a pretty good character for the most part, although, with all of her librarian skills and research knowledge, some of her sleuthing should have been a lot more of a no-brainer. For example, she could have researched public records for ownership of the island instead of relying on an old man's memory.

I really liked Sully, who was a good-looking, steady, sensible man instead of an impossibly gorgeous hunk who made every woman he looked at want to jump his bones. I enjoyed how the relationship between him and Lindsey started off slowly and seemed to be steadily blossoming into something a little more serious. Thank goodness, the plot was not overshadowed by the tiresome trope of the main character's lusty obsession with the hot, sexy man in her life!

This was a nice, light read that piqued my interest enough to want to continue on with the series. Oct 05, Dawn rated it liked it Shelves: librarian-character , set-in-autumn , cozy-mystery. I found this book while browsing at the library. The covers of Cozy Mysteries are what make me want to read them Usually I end up being somewhat disappointed by the stereotypical characters and the mediocre writing, but this one was better than the average.

There are still stereotypes: the "lemon," the old-school librarian who is not only resistant to change but to helping people in general; the fat, slovenly police officer who is a dumbass; the thin, well-dressed detective who is not; the si I found this book while browsing at the library. There are still stereotypes: the "lemon," the old-school librarian who is not only resistant to change but to helping people in general; the fat, slovenly police officer who is a dumbass; the thin, well-dressed detective who is not; the single, cute, sweet, oh did I mention he's single, police officer who flirts with the main character.

The main character is Lindsey, a former academic librarian who accepts the position as public library director in a small town in Connecticut. There are tons of references to novels that the book-lover will enjoy. For example, Lindsey chats about the Hunger Games trilogy with her barista.

How Deception Can Be Deceiving in Poker

The children's librarian who dresses up as The Hungry Caterpillar. It was all very cutesy, fluffy, mindless reading that is perfect for a rainy, cool autumn day the book is set in October. A few things that bothered me The victim of the story was SO obnoxious and rude to his girlfriend that I didn't see how anyone could bear to be with him for 5 years. Also, there were some things that Lindsey should have known as a librarian that would have made her a better detective, like the fact that sales of houses are public records and she should have been able to find the owner of a house with a simple internet search.

Other than that, I think I would continue with the series when the next one comes out in Jan 21, Melodie rated it really liked it Shelves: read Jenn McKinlay is a very good writer!! I love her Cupcake Bakery series, and this new series is starting off just as good! Like the characters, the location and the story was great. I didn't figure out "whodunit" until very close to the end! Apr 04, Linda rated it really liked it Shelves: challenge.

Great start to the series. We get to meet Lindsey, the new head librarian and her best friend Beth. I liked both of them and the rest of the supporting characters. There is such a fun small town vibe in this series. The mystery was good and I was solving at the same rate Lindsey was. Looking forward to the next book.

Books Can Be Deceiving (Library Lover's Mystery Series #1)

I think that Jenn McKinlay is one of my most favorite cozy author out there. I quite often have no idea who the murderer is and I like her characters so very much. Her college friend Beth is already ensconced there as the Children's Book Director and Lindsey is grateful to have a friend as she makes this move. There are a host o I think that Jenn McKinlay is one of my most favorite cozy author out there.

There are a host of other interesting and quirky characters, including a woman who has been there for "a hundred years" and is referred to as "the Lemon". And off they go, hunting down clues to clear Beth's name. It was a fun romp and the end was pretty surprising; I never really saw that kind of twist coming [though I had figured some of it out just not all the particulars]. Very good start to a new-to-me series. Oct 14, Carla Johnson-Hicks rated it really liked it Shelves: library , cozy-mystery , adult-fiction.

This is a series that I have wanted to read for awhile. After all the comments about how good this series is, and having read and enjoyed many other books by Jenn McKinlay, I decided I needed to give it a try. I did enjoy this story, but not as much as I had anticipated. Her best friend Beth works with her as the children's librarian. There are several other employees, but I must mentions Ms. Cole, who is This is a series that I have wanted to read for awhile. Cole, who is called "The Lemon" behind her back. Lindsey is settling in well, making some long overdue changes to the library and getting the Library Board's vote of confidence.

All seems well, until Beth and her boyfriend of five years, Rick break up. When Beth finds out that the children's book she has been writing has been plagarized, she is ready to go and give Rick a piece of her mind. When Lindsey, Beth and Captain Sulley show up on the private island, they find Rick in no condition to listen to anything Beth has to say. With the breakup and plagarism, Beth becomes the main suspect, in fact, the only suspect as far as the sheriff is concerned.

This was a great cast of characters, including several townspeople, the library workers and the ladies who participate in "Crafternoon" that made the story interesting.


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The small town feel with the gossip mill that I love in cozies, was in full swing. He was the chair of the library board and when things got a bit sticky, I loved how he stood up for his staff. There is a rather nosy reporter who I would have liked to kick out of town, but again, it made the book interesting. There were not a lot of clues, so it is the questioning and nosiness that eventually reveal the culprit. I had a suspicion of who the killer was, and I was correct, but there was quite a twist at the end of the story that I was not expecting. A good cozy story that is a good introduction to this series and to Briar Creek.

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I am definitely going to read more in this series. Feb 17, Marlene rated it really liked it. Originally published at Reading Reality I discovered this series as a read-alike for the Cat in the Stacks series by Miranda James, and it certainly. Both feature real-seeming librarians in almost-real libraries in small towns that are just perfect.

She is also female, single, unencumbered and in her mids — very different from widowed, something Charlie with his grown children — and Diesel. Lindsey on the other hand, is still feeling her way professionally and personally. She had been an archivist at one of the Yale University libraries when budget cuts forced her to look in other directions. Being a new, first-time director has its challenges.

But no one plans on having one of their staff, particularly a friend, accused of murder. Escape Rating B: I came down with the flu, and was looking for comfort reading again. As this will be posted just before I run off to the American Library Association Midwinter Conference, yet another library mystery seemed like a good fit. And for the same reason — her creator is also a library worker. Seeing what Lindsey deals with, even in a fictional and perfectly imperfect library reminds me that I was right. This story is the introduction to the series, the characters and the town of Briar Creek, and it does put the reader firmly into the middle of the action.

Lindsey, as a transplant from somewhere else, is still warming up to the little town, and vice-versa, which makes her a good point of view character for the reader. As is often the case, the case itself, the murder at the heart of the mystery, is just a bit over the top, but the scenes of small town life and Lindsey fitting herself into it are well done. A lot of what happens in the Briar Creek Public Library is very true to library life, both the good and the bad.

Books Can Be Deceiving (Library Lover's) | The English Bookshop

Every library, big and small, has patrons just like those in Briar Creek, the good, the bad, the loud, the demanding, the weird and the obstreperous. The staff, while occasionally a bit too good to be true and sometimes a bit too bad or weird to be true, is also quite true-to-life. One of them has begun raising blind, just about every hand. And two of the other players are shoving every other hand, regardless of their holdings. Seems unlikely?

In both of those situations, energized by the insane play of their opponents, the other players were also playing One player would buy in for the minimum whenever he lost his stack, then would call just about any hand preflop and only fold on the flop if he thought he had absolutely no chance of winning. With any draw — even the longest draw possible — he'd stay in for his short stack, only to buy back in again for the minimum when he invariably lost.

Another player was so intoxicated by the action that he was often shoving blind himself — and laughing madly while doing so. No reason, no strategy, nothing but pure, unmitigated gambling. So you say these are extreme examples. And of course you're right. Games like these don't come around very often. They're outliers. But variations of them, somewhat more sane variations, happen regularly, with one, two, or three players not playing logically or sensibly, but just gambling. When that is happening, the importance of using deception decreases significantly. You don't want to deceive your subpar opponents with tricky plays, bluffs, semi-bluffs, or by slow playing.

You just want to think about the pot odds and, perhaps even more, the implied odds and your drawing odds. Play by the book, percent "ABC poker," and you will eventually in the long run win the money. Deception be damned. There's another problem with always making it a goal to play deceptively. We occasionally can justify bad play on our part by rationalizing it as a deceptive play. We can sometimes justify our incorrect and habitual inclination to be aggressive, passive, weak, or tight — or just sloppy in our thinking — by telling ourselves that we were just trying to deceive our opponents. We raise big because it feels good to do so, and then we say to ourselves that we were trying to bluff our opponents into folding even though a more thoughtful approach would have had us folding.

We call rather than raise, not because we should but because we are afraid of putting more money at risk — but we justify it as a deceptive move with our strong hand. Indeed, for some players, the idea of using deception becomes a means with which to deceive themselves. Yes, there are times to deceive. But at least as often — if not more often in most low-stakes games — you need to learn how to exploit the unforced mistakes of your opponents with your own solid and straightforward play.

Ashley Adams has been playing poker for 50 years and writing about it since He is also the host of poker radio show House of Cards. See www. Finding a trustworthy room to play online poker can be a monumental burden. That's all the more true if you're just looking for a place to play poker for free.

We've listed five of the best play-money poker sites to enjoy and help hone your skills. From the New York Times bestselling author of The Cupcake Bakery Mysteries comes the start of a series about a library where the mysteries refuse to stay in the fiction section… Lindsey is getting into her groove as the director of the Briar Creek Public Library when a New York editor visits town, creating quite a buzz. Lindsey has to act fast—before they throw the book at the wrong person.


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What more could any reader ask? Paperback —. Add to Cart. About Books Can Be Deceiving From the New York Times bestselling author of The Cupcake Bakery Mysteries comes the start of a series about a library where the mysteries refuse to stay in the fiction section… Lindsey is getting into her groove as the director of the Briar Creek Public Library when a New York editor visits town, creating quite a buzz. Listen to a sample from Books Can Be Deceiving.

Also by Jenn McKinlay.